Forum Posts

西法特西法特
Aug 02, 2022
In General Discussion
As Director of Digital Product and Experience at PepsiCo Europe, Mia Sorgi is responsible for answering that question. She describes her role as a “hybrid role”: “Right now, I’m in ecommerce, strictly speaking, but … we’re trying to build capability in the creation of connected experiences across the sector. “What does that mean? That sounds very grand – basically, there’s an emphasis on how things are made and how they’re designed from a user perspective and the front end journey, but then also… how you deliver the experience behind that in terms of tech stack and data, so what goes on backstage as well.” Sorgi balances her time between the day-to-day practicalities of helping PepsiCo’s partner retailers and restaurant partners succeed, and also keeping an eye on emerging trends in retail and ecommerce to ensure PepsiCo stays at the cutting edge. “We have different levels of maturity across our different European markets, in terms of what we’re doing – but also what our B2B customers are doing,” she says. “And so, we’re trying to be thought leaders and offer support to them as well as run things better internally.” I recently sat down with Sorgi to learn more about the work PepsiCo has been doing with “connected experiences” – a phrase she prefers over the term ‘omnichannel’ – and what she believes are the major trends shaping the future of retail, as well as PepsiCo’s approach to experimenting with new innovations and exploring what Sorgi calls the “art of the possible”. More than a checklist: omnichannel versus “connected experiences” Despite how futuristic “build[ing] capability in the creation of connected experiences” sounds, Sorgi emphasises that this part of her role isn’t necessarily about complex technology. Rather, it’s an approach to designing interactions across touchpoints – making sure the different interactions are joined-up and cohesive and that they are implemented in an intentional way. “Connected experience is broadly the output of experience design, involving digital touchpoints – and making sure you don’t just do ‘a website’ in isolation, or ‘a chatbot’ in isolation,” she says. “An app can be a connected experience; it’s more about the fact that you’re not delivering these digital products in isolation, [but rather as] part of a cohesive strategy across touchpoints.” This might sound to anyone reading like another name for omnichannel, but Sorgi distinguishes between omnichannel, which she sees as a “capability” rather than a strategy, and connected experiences, which to her represent a broader underlying approach to designing interactions. “Too often people approach omnichannel by ticking things off a list, rather than being very intentional about the experience of designing for people as they go through a series of interactions.” As a result, Sorgi says that she is “always a little bit cautious” about the word ‘omnichannel’, “because I think people take it as a to-do list rather than a capability.” When it comes to creating connected experiences, Sorgi emphasises that the technology should always be “in service of the experience” – rather than the other way around. “The tech will always change shape, and it’s in service of the experience. Having said that, it can be complex and a major drain on resources – you want to make sure you’re not building something for no reason, so start small and create proof points.” The workload like this whatsapp number list allows both the vendor and the affiliate to focus on. Clicks are the number of clicks coming to your website’s URL from organic search results. She gives the example of chatbots, which at the height of their popularity were often implemented by companies without a good understanding of their strengths or how to measure their effectiveness. “People were building all these chatbots that no-one really wanted to use or that didn’t work very well, or they wouldn’t really understand the metrics behind them. “Conversational interfaces continue to hold great promise – but you have to deploy them with care, and it’s hard. You have to take it seriously and build and iterate, rather than just stick something in there and assume it’s going to be fit for purpose.” PepsiCo has had “varying degrees of success” with its own chatbots across Europe, but has found that chatbots with a limited scope can be very effective, such as the one currently live on the Walkers site, which Sorgi says “performs extremely well for us”. “We keep the scope of it very narrow just to not overpromise, and to pave the way as we consider doing more with conversation,” she says. “That’s a learning thing for us – we’re able to help customers get answers more quickly, and we learn in house rather than outsourcing at great expense with dubious results.” The Walkers UK chatbot is an example of a chatbot that performs well, enabling PepsiCo to answer customer questions and learn more about conversational interfaces. (Image: walkers.co.uk)
What does it mean to build a truly cohesive retail ?
 content media
0
0
1

西法特西法特

More actions